DIY Repair broken VLT2 headphone out - out of warranty

  1. #1 by Jimmy Herpy on 1 Week Ago
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    Posts: 4

    DIY Repair broken VLT2 headphone out - out of warranty

    Hi all,

    The headphone out jack on my VLT2 is broken. Looking inside the unit, it appears that the plastic between the TRRS (edit: or TRS) contacts is cracked, causing them to "spring upward", so the aux input no longer makes contact.

    Screenshot of the piece i'm talking about:

    https://imgur.com/a/5hedPYx




    Repair was quoted to be 120$ labor, 20-100$ parts, $20 return shipping for a grand total of $160 minimum for this little annoyance.

    Can anyone weigh in on if this would be possible to repair locally (i.e.... give it to someone who repairs pedals and such). It seems as simple as removing the broken 3.5mm socket and soldering on a compatible replacement... however, I haven't been able to find one online. Does anyone know who manufactures this part, or if a generic part would work (assuming I can access the jack through the side of the unit).?

    Last edited by Jimmy Herpy; 1 Week Ago at 02:05 PM.
  2. #2 by Mark Farrell on 1 Week Ago
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    Posts: 95
    Most stereo headphone jacks are TRS. Are you pretty sure it's TRRS which would be more commonly used with a headset/mic combo?
    I'm not familiar with the VLT2. Does the headphone jack actually affect the 'aux input' somehow? If so there could be a contact in the headphone jack that acts as a 'switch' to do something to the aux input.

    The tough part will be finding a jack that has solder pins that mate up with the holes in the printed circuit board. You could likely order the part from 'Music Group' and be assured it's the correct one, but there appears to be a minimum order amount plus shipping.

    I think what's in there is a version of this. Physically a bit different. It's called 4 pole which may be why it appears to look like a TRRS.
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/2pcs...847234488.html
    If you can get a closer clearer pic of the jack I'll see what I can find.

    A local music shop that does service should be able to repair it. There's likely to be a minimum $$ bench charge just to look at it and open up before a repair actually begins.
  3. #3 by Jimmy Herpy on 1 Week Ago
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    Posts: 4
    Thanks for the info Mark. I'm not very familiar with electronics so the headphone out is very likely TRS as you suggested (there is another dedicated aux-in on the back of the unit).
  4. #4 by Jimmy Herpy on 1 Week Ago
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    Posts: 4
    Here are some better pictures of the piece from my actual unit. You can see the crack in the plastic, and there is some visible corrosion on the first two contacts.

    web link for photos: https://imgur.com/a/246ejrm

    Looking closely... it's actually an 8-pin socket manufactured by "JT" (couldn't find them online). But it looks very similar to the components below. I'm going to order a few and see how they look.

    https://www.newbecca.com/product/44023607300

    https://www.aliexpress.com/af/8-pin-...wCP=y&jump=afs
    Attached Images Attached Images

    Last edited by Jimmy Herpy; 1 Week Ago at 03:06 PM.
  5. #5 by Mark Farrell on 1 Week Ago
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    Posts: 95
    I guess it is indeed a TRRS jack, but wired to accept a TRS stereo headphone plug.

    I found some jacks of the style on ebay from China...... (slow boat from China delivery time)
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...s+smt&_sacat=0

    I couldn't find any similar jacks from the US parts retailers I generally use, but I don't know your location as well.

    It's possible a shop that repairs laptops or phones might be able to solder a new jack in. Not sure if they may even have a replacement jack like that, but usually jacks in a laptop or phone are built more ruggedly than what I'm seeing in the VLT. It's a fairly straight forward soldering job that shouldn't be too difficult. A music shop that does electronics repair also should be fix it as well.

    Image below is the schematic wiring of the jack.......