Inuke 8 ohms per channel

  1. #1 by Alan Dawson on 07-02-2018
    Alan Dawson's Avatar
    Posts: 6

    Inuke 8 ohms per channel

    Hi, All the specs for the inuke amps only say rating for 2 ohms or 4 ohms per channel. If you have a smaller gig and you only have an 8 ohm speaker per channel is it safe for the amp to run at 8 ohms per channel. I am looking at a NU1000 or an NU3000. Also what output would you get at 8 ohms per channel for these amps?

    Cheers
    Alan.
  2. #2 by Glenn Adams on 07-02-2018
    Glenn Adams's Avatar
    Posts: 2,274
    The NU ratings are close to double for half the load. If you cut the 4 ohm loaded wattage in half you can be sure to get at least that much power into an 8 ohm speaker. As far as safe, the lower the load the more current is drawn and more unsafe it is. A 1 ohm would be very unsafe, 2, not that great but will run, 4 and 8 all day and all night. 16 and you just half the power at 8, why bother.

    Amp clipping is unsafe and that can happen at any load. If you drive it to just under the limit light coming one you should be safe, unless the speaker is too low of wattage rating and gets mechanically overdriven.

    "Sometimes it's the people who no one imagines anything of, who do the things that no one can imagine"
  3. #3 by Alan Dawson on 07-02-2018
    Alan Dawson's Avatar
    Posts: 6
    The why bother bit is that at this size gig we only need an 8 ohm speaker on each side on the PA. We also don't need the volume. I could run the amp with both speakers plugged into one channel, but it's nice to keep the stereo left / right.

    All my speaker cabs are 8 ohm which is very common. I have been thinking of buying a NU3000 or even a NU1000 to put in a rack with a QSC touchmix (which I already own) for smaller gigs. I have another amp rack for the larger gigs and a X32, but I would just like a compact setup for the small gigs. I just want to make sure that the NU series wont have trouble running 8 ohms all night.

    Alan.
  4. #4 by Robert Lofgren on 07-02-2018
    Robert Lofgren's Avatar
    Posts: 5,062
    There is no issue with running at higher ohm ratings. You will usually experience a slightly lower level due to less power going into the speaker.

    __________________________________________________ _______________________

    Check the knowledgebase at https://kb.musictri.be/mghome

    For official technical and warranty support for your product you should contact the support team through their CARE department. You can contact CARE by phone at (+1) 702-800-8290 for the US and Canada and (+44) 1562 732290 in Europe.

    You can also contact CARE support via email at CARECREA@music-group.com. They strive to respond to emails within 24-48 hours during normal business hours, but please be patient if it takes longer due to the volume of emails they receive.


    Robert Lofgren
    Volunteer Forum Community Moderator
  5. #5 by Glenn Adams on 07-03-2018
    Glenn Adams's Avatar
    Posts: 2,274
    I have a small rig with the XR18 and one NU4-6000. I switch the 100hz crossover and bridge a pair of VP1800s (4 ohms) and the other 2 channels switched for 100hz and up to a left right 8 ohm box on a stick I made with 2-8 and a 1 com driver and to is way loud. In most places I only see the sig, led on peaks on any channel.

    "Sometimes it's the people who no one imagines anything of, who do the things that no one can imagine"
  6. #6 by Tom Galarno on 07-05-2018
    Tom Galarno's Avatar
    Posts: 1

    Rule of thumb . Higher OHM, Lower Output .

    As someone above has pointed out . If you increase your ohm resistance over the rated spec, simply divide your power rating by half . . . (e.g. Output = 3000 W into 2 ohm = 1500 W into 4 = 750 W into 8 = 375binto 16) . . . and so forth . this is a basic rule of thumb and I do not claim it to be 100% accurate, but basically for practical application, you can use as guideline . Don't forget, this is OUTPUT . you're still Inputing up to 3000 W, but it's being resisted by the ohms . . . or something like that . I own an iNuke 3000 and drive 4 ohm bass cab . I'm careful about how hard I hit it and use a limiter too . . . just be sensible and don't expect 3000 W to be kicking your audience ass when you're using an 8 ohm cab. OH, and going the other way, (depending on how they're wired, series or parallel), two 8 ohm cabs can = 4 ohms .